Archives for October 2015

Facilitation as Improv

I am so thankful that my parents were never concerned about what I would do with a drama degree. Theatre, specifically improvisation, has turned out to be the perfect foundation for my career as a facilitator.

Each time I facilitate, I have an audience (participants), a place to perform (meeting facility) and a loose script (agenda). But then, the magic happens as I attune myself to the energy in the room, and work off unplanned inputs and events. Success depends on me being fully present and in the moment.

The rules of improv easily apply to facilitation. For example, consider how facilitators could apply these Commandments for Improv:

  1. We are all supporting actors.
  2. Always check your impulses.
  3. Never enter a scene unless you are NEEDED.
  4. Your prime responsibility is to support.
  5. Work at the top of your brains at all times.
  6. Never underestimate or condescend to your audience.
  7. Trust… trust your fellow actors to support you; trust them to come through if you lay something heavy on them; trust yourself.
  8. Avoid judging except in terms of whether a situation needs help, what can best follow, or how you can support it imaginatively.
  9. LISTEN

Canada is blessed with great improv institutions such as Second City in Toronto  and Loose Moose in my hometown of Calgary. The benefits of learning improv include:

  • Increased confidence
  • Improved public speaking skills
  • More comfort in social settings
  • Refined brainstorming abilities
  • Improved listening and observation skills
  • Enhanced creative-thinking abilities
  • Improved decision-making skills

So improv artists, a second career in facilitation awaits you. And facilitators, improv can help deepen your craft. As they say in the Green Room, go break a leg.

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